Health Systems Innovation

The MIT Sloan Initiative for Health Systems Innovation (HSI) identifies high-quality, cost effective health systems as essential to individual and societal wellbeing. HSI plays a pivotal role in the transformation of health care systems through industry-based research. HSI brings together faculty, researchers, and practitioners from across MIT and around the world to advance health management and delivery through applied research. Contact us


Blue and Silver StetoscopeThe Johnson & Johnson Experience

October 11th, 2018
 

A recent widely-reported study, The Illinois Workplace Wellness Study, suggests that workplace wellness initiatives do not produce an improvement in health or cost savings. This seminar will contrast the data from this study with that of the Johnson & Johnson Global Health Services department. Dr. Targino's internal observations over the last 20 years suggest that there are multiple reasons to support a robust corporate health and wellness program.  He will also discuss the difficult biases when one analyzes the results of such programs.

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Treating Health Care Woes Through Data  Analysis

September 19, 2018
 

MIT Sloan professor of management and operations research Dimitris Bertsimas has an idea  that data-based   algorithms could help cure health care problems — both in patients and  hospital administration. Learn more in the "Data Made to Matter" podcast.

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Community Servings

How A Nonprofit Meals Provider Will Triple The People It Serves

 

By Edward Mason  |  July 20, 2018

A group of MIT Sloan students has worked with Community Servings, a Boston nonprofit that delivers meals to chronically ill people, to help it triple the number of people it serves each year.

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An Emphasis on Health

 
 
MIT Spectrum Winter 2018

Retsef Levi and colleagues are helping to create a medical system focused on improving patient outcomes.

“You cannot change performance just by changing your pay structure,” Levi contends.  “You need to design for performance, and then follow up with appropriate incentives.”

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Featured Research:

Hospital quality scores really do reflect patient outcomes

Research from MIT Sloan professor links quality to lower readmissions, mortality rates.

During the heated debates over health care spending, there are often calls to “pay for quality” rather than paying for every service provided. Medicare, for example, is starting down the road of tying hospital quality scores to reimbursements. Some in the health care industry say this is unfair, as a score alone does not account for the many factors that impact patient outcomes.

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